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September 03, 2017 3 min read

This house may not have an official name but it does have an incredible presence. Built by a Swiss couple, one of whom is an attorney and the other a harpist, this house is situated in a small hamlet called Les Jeurs, just above the Col de la Forclaz mountain road not far from Geneva. Built on land that has been in their family since the 1800's, this house has been designed as not only a mountain retreat but also as a place that the couple can raise a family and eventually call their permanent home. Designed by Swiss architects Lacroix Chessex this house is one that reflects the clients needs and choices to perfection.

This house may not have an official name but it does have an incredible presence. Built by a Swiss couple, one of whom is an attorney and the other a harpist, this house is situated in a small hamlet called Les Jeurs, just above the Col de la Forclaz mountain road not far from Geneva. Built on land that has been in their family since the 1800's, this house has been designed as not only a mountain retreat but also as a place that the couple can raise a family and eventually call their permanent home. Designed by Swiss architects Lacroix Chessex this house is one that reflects the clients needs and choices to perfection.



Lacroix Chessex took inspiration for the design of this house from the region's traditional stone and wooden homes and the landscape within which they sit. From all angles the house reflects a portion of the surrounding peaks and valleys with sharp lines framing the exterior of the house whilst the interior has flowing bends and smooth corners that juxtapose each other. Despite its obvious modern image, the house does manage to blend into the historical context of the region, helped by the tall, vertical lines formed by the buildings exterior grey fir cladding. The house has also been cantilevered on a concrete plinth that mimics the practical design of Swiss barns which are elevated to prevent mice from getting into them.

Lacroix Chessex took inspiration for the design of this house from the region's traditional stone and wooden homes and the landscape within which they sit. From all angles the house reflects a portion of the surrounding peaks and valleys with sharp lines framing the exterior of the house whilst the interior has flowing bends and smooth corners that juxtapose each other. Despite its obvious modern image, the house does manage to blend into the historical context of the region, helped by the tall, vertical lines formed by the buildings exterior grey fir cladding. The house has also been cantilevered on a concrete plinth that mimics the practical design of Swiss barns which are elevated to prevent mice from getting into them.



Moving on to the interior and the feel and design of the building shifts. Angular walls blend into sweeping lines and the grey fir of the exterior transforms into a lighter natural fir on the interior that makes the building feel spacious and airy in all the rooms. By using the same material for all the walls and floors doesn't close the space in as you might expect but instead gives a feeling of a single space that is separated from but still in tune with the surrounding environment. With views of spectacular Swiss mountains, this is certainly one cabin that we would love to call our own.

Moving on to the interior and the feel and design of the building shifts. Angular walls blend into sweeping lines and the grey fir of the exterior transforms into a lighter natural fir on the interior that makes the building feel spacious and airy in all the rooms. By using the same material for all the walls and floors doesn't close the space in as you might expect but instead gives a feeling of a single space that is separated from but still in tune with the surrounding environment. With views of spectacular Swiss mountains, this is certainly one cabin that we would love to call our own.



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